Édith Piaf and Charles Aznavour

PIAF-AZNAVOUR-CONSTATINE-EMER

Édith Piaf was a French singer, songwriter, cabaret performer and film actress noted as France’s national chanteuse and one of the country’s widely known international stars.
Piaf’s music was often autobiographical and she specialized in chanson and torch ballads about love, loss and sorrow. Her most widely known songs include La Vie en rose” (1946), “Non, je ne regrette rien”, “Hymne à l’amour”, “Milord”, “La Foule”, “L’Accordéoniste”, and “Padam, padam…”
Since her death in 1963, several biographies and films have studied her life, including 2007’s Academy Award-winning La Vie en rose — and Piaf has become one of the most celebrated performers of the 20th century.

Charles Aznavour was born in Saint-Germain-des-Prés, Paris, to Armenian immigrants Michael Aznavourian and Knar Baghdasarian, an Armenian from Turkey. His father sang in restaurants in France before establishing a Caucasian restaurant called Le Caucase. Charles’s parents introduced him to performing at an early age, and he dropped out of school aged nine, taking the stage name “Aznavour”. His big break came in 1946 when the singer Édith Piaf heard him sing and arranged to take him with her on tour in France and to the United States.